#9851

Thanks to everyone for sharing. I think all your points are so relevant to this discussion. I wanted to preface this post by saying I completed my MSW practicum with EPI here in Kelowna. I recently got a position on the team but don’t actually start until the end of May, but I have been completing the modules and feel I learned a great deal during my practicum.

There was a point in a couple previous posts about the expectations of family, in terms of their loved ones struggling with mental health and not being as high functioning as parents had hoped. That may definitely be true when discussing psychosis and family dynamics. The same may also be true of any parent/child relationship, regardless of mental health concerns. I think parents will always have high expectations of their children, especially regarding education and employment. When individuals struggle with something like psychosis, its more likely the parents fear of how their child will function throughout life or the parents feelings of not being able to “control” or “fix” their child’s illness as much as they would like to, as opposed to them simply not living up to expectations. With that in mind, I think involving the families as much as possible, and providing education on an ongoing basis, will be crucial to fostering the parents understanding of their child’s need and how they will be able to move forward in life, so as not to see their children as failures due to mental health, but rather successes, despite all they have had to overcome, in terms of their struggles with psychosis and still managing daily life.

Great discussion!
Rob